Here’s How to Identify an Allergy Headache, According to an Allergist

You're hydrating regularly and getting ahead of your stress, but your headaches won't quit — seasonal allergies may be the one trigger you haven't outsmarted.

According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, throbbing headaches that occur over the sinus area of your face (your cheekbones, eyes, bridge of the nose, and forehead) or on one side of your head are often allergy-induced.

"The usual seasonal-allergy headache will be associated with a lot of nasal congestion and other nasal and eye symptoms," Dr. Alan Goldsobel, MD, with the Allergy & Asthma Associates of Northern California, adds.

Throughout spring and early summer, Dr. Goldsobel explains that allergens — which generally create inflammation and swelling in the nasal passages and sinus cavities — can also trigger migraines in people who are prone to them.

If seasonal-allergy headaches are negatively affecting your quality of life, Dr. Goldsobel suggests that you see a doctor. In the meantime, over-the-counter medications like allergy antihistamines, anti-allergy nasal sprays, acetaminophens, or NSAIDs could help ease your pain.

Reducing your exposure to allergens by avoiding the outdoors during peak-pollen times — like midmorning, early evening, and while the wind is blowing — can also lower your risk of allergy headaches.

While inside, keep your doors and windows closed, wash your hands or take a shower after being outside, and usRead More – Source