The Chinese lab cloning peoples dead pets for thousands of pounds

Beijing-based Sinogene is making people's pets last for decades through cloning

Sinogene is making peoples pets last for decades through cloning (Picture: AFP/Getty)

A laboratory in China is accepting thousands in exchange to clone dead animals so heartbroken owners can make their pets live for decades.

Beijing-based Sinogene revealed last week it had cloned the countrys first kitten, called Garlic, which was born on July 21.

Garlics heartbroken owner Huang Yu, 24, paid for the procedure after struggling to come to terms with the death of his original pet.

Sinogene charges CN¥250,000 (£28,600) to clone a cat and CN¥380,000 (£43,500) to re-create a dog.

The companys chief executive, Mi Jidong, had previously explained dogs are more expensive to clone because the window for harvesting their eggs is very small.

Now a young woman is set to follow suit after being left devastated by the death of her border collie, which she bought while studying in the UK.

China's first cloned kitten called Garlic at the Chinese company Sinogene, a pet cloning outfit which has cloned more than 40 pet dogs since 2017, in Beijing

Garlic became Chinas first cloned kitten (Picture: AFP/Getty)

 a laboratory technician working at the Chinese company Sinogene, a pet cloning outfit which has cloned more than 40 pet dogs since 2017, in Beijing

Sinogene charges thousands for the service (Picture: AFP/Getty)

China's first cloned kitten called Garlic (bottom) being licked by its surrogate mother at the Chinese company Sinogene, a pet cloning outfit which has cloned more than 40 pet dogs since 2017, in Beijing

Garlic was born via a surrogate mother (Picture: AFP/Getty)

 laboratory personnel checking a surrogate mother dog with an ultrasound machine at the Chinese company Sinogene, a pet cloning outfit which has cloned more than 40 pet dogs since 2017, in Beijing.

Dogs can be cloned for a higher fee (Picture: AFP/Getty)

Hui Hui, 24, from Hangzhou, the capital of Zhejiang Province in East China, has borrowed £28,000 of her parents money to clone her beloved Xiaodi.

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The young woman turned to the pet cloning company after Xiaodi – bought in Scotland in the summer of 2013 – died of illness in April.

She spent around £230 for the funeral but is planning to spend the next four years paying her parents back for the cloning procedure, who were shocked by her suggestion.

Hui Hui said: Im not very rich and am usually very frugal.

When my dog, Xiaodi, died, we didnt have any sort of grand ceremony.

Sinogene Vice-President Zhao Jianping said Xiaodis clone is expected to be born within the next month.

 Pet dog 'Xiaodi' died of illness, but its clone will be born in two weeks.

Hui Huis border collie Xiaodi died in April and is in the process of being cloned (Picture: AsiaWire)

a laboratory technician checking samples with a microscope at the Chinese company Sinogene, a pet cloning outfit which has cloned more than 40 pet dogs since 2017, in Beijing.

A new Xiaodi puppy is expected to be born within 20 days (Picture: AFP/Getty)